22 December 2009

Toy Story, Part 2

A Brutalist bathroom suite for the progressive child [or their dollhouse surrogate self], rendered in wood rather than béton. You may be startled at the source for these pieces—I certainly was. potterybarnkids.com

2 comments:

  1. I missed out on dollhouses. My boys grew up with action figures, allowing them to play gas station, space station and various other stations made from spare parts. They served the same function as dollhouses, minus the domesticity, yet neither of my boys grew up believing that kitchens or bathrooms were particularly feminine in nature. They just thought that killing, maiming and obliterating action figures was more fun than playing house. Later, they discovered that nothing in the world was quite so fun as playing house. So, it all worked out. They're each capable of fixing dinner and cleaning toilets. They know about sheets and pillowcases, and they're capable of ironing with the best of them. Somewhere in the Sixties there was a push to replace dollhouses with, what was it, tiny laboratories or executive office suites with male secretaries. I suppose it's reasonable that society sometimes requires a push to overcome imbalances, but give dollhouses to boys and they'll soon figure out how to shoot guns out the window and throw things from the roof. And girls, I suppose, will figure out how to heal the wounded. It's not society that makes human nature but the perversion of it that sometimes makes society the unfortunate thing it is. Maybe I'm setting myself against the grain, but I find these dollhouse toys you're presenting to be more and more interesting.

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  2. It's been a long time since I even gave dollhouses a thought, actually. One glance at the Etsy listings for this category showed me how this toy has evolved; some items are still basic pieces of furniture, while others come accessorized to a degree that would impress a professional interiors stylist. The latter can be lovely, but, in my opinion, leaves little room for imagination.

    It's a small, small world.

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